Content thumbnail Toolkit for Corporate Action to End Gun Violence

Toolkit for Corporate Action to End Gun Violence

January 2022

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Executive Summary: What You Will Find in the Toolkit This Toolkit for Corporate Action on Gun Violence was developed to guide companies as they work to address gun violence, both internally in their own operations and externally in the communities they are linked to. The Toolkit is split into three sections: the business case, framework, and industry deep dives. BUSINESS CASE FRAMEWORK INDUSTRY DEEP DIVES Objective: Objective: Objective: Demonstrate how business is interconnected with Provide examples of potential actions for Demonstrate for specific sectors detailed case gun violence and show the importance of companies and connect with useful resources on studies, actions, and key learnings for business company action on gun violence. advancing strategies against gun violence. action on gun violence. Contents Contents Contents • Why businesses should be concerned with • Shows stages of action from most nascent Industry-specific deep dives for: gun violence. (stage 1) to most advanced (stage 4) for • Healthcare services and facilities • Understanding where your company is in the companies taking action on gun violence. • Retail gun violence supply chain. • Financial services • Media and social media • Technology This toolkit was developed by BSR with the support of Everytown for Gun Safety who provided their expert perspectives on the topic of gun safety.

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Executive Summary: How Companies Can Use the Toolkit Companies can use the toolkit in three ways: to make the business case for action, to assess where their company intersects with gun violence, and to identify opportunities to integrate actions to prevent gun violence in with existing strategies. Assess where your Build the business case company intersects Identify actions to with the gun violence address gun violence value chain Use business case data to raise Review the gun violence value chain Follow the framework to understand internal and external awareness on and industry deep dives to identify the different stages of action from the importance of company action to where your company intersects with beginner to advanced and develop prevent gun violence. gun violence. actions to address gun violence through new or existing work on human rights and community development.

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Getting Started: Assess: Assess where your company intersects with the gun violence value chain Engagement (see section 3, Taking Action). Review: Checklist Review Employee Health and Safety policies and products and services to ensure gun safety provisions are included to keep employees and customers safe (See section 3, Workforce and Operations and Products and Services). Five action items for your company to Raise awareness: start taking action on ending gun violence: Raise awareness within your organization on gun safety, including education, and training (See section 3, Workforce and Operations). Support: Support and partner with civil society organizations at the national level and in local communities working on gun safety and ending gun violence and conducting outreach (See section 3, Community Engagement). Participate: Participate in national and state-level sign-on letters and policy advocacy to support gun safety regulations (See section 3, Policy and Advocacy).

1 Why Business Should Be Concerned with Gun Violence Understanding Where You Are in the Gun Violence Value Chain 2 A Framework for Corporate Action to End Gun Violence 3 Taking Action Table of Workforce and Operations Products and Services Contents Community Engagement Policy and Advocacy 4 Industry Deep Dives Retail Financial Services Media and Social Media Technology Healthcare Services and Facilities 5 Reporting on Gun Violence Prevention Efforts 6 Annex Key Terms and Definitions Resources for Employee Resource Group

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Why Business Should 01 Be Concerned with Gun Violence

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Gun violence impacts communities around the country and costs companies millions annually Gun violence is a national human rights issue in the U.S. related to the most severe human rights abuse—the right to life. While it cuts across class, race, ethnic, and geographic lines, it disproportionately impacts communities of color. Businesses, their employees, business partners, and customers are likely to have been impacted by gun violence at some point. Gun violence is a national problem • 58 percent of American adults or someone they care for have experienced gun violence in their lifetime. • On average, more than 100 Americans are killed with guns every day, and hundreds more are wounded. In the U.S., it’s possible to go to work— be it at a retail store, a corporate office, Companies lose millions annually due to gun violence a distribution center, or a grocery store—on an otherwise normal day and • Gun violence costs taxpayers, businesses, survivors, families, and never come home to your family. communities $280 billion per year—on top of the immeasurable emotional costs. • Employers lose $1.4 million a day in productivity, revenue, and costs associated with gun violence.

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Gun violence is not as divisive of a topic There is broad support for gun safety legislation in as many companies believe it is the U.S. across states lines and political parties. AMERICANS OPINIONS ON GUN LAWS: Oct. 5-11, 2017; *Less than 0.5% GALLUP Favor Oppose No opinion 92 percent of Americans % % % support background Requiring background checks for all gun purchases 96 4 * checksfor gun sales, and 57 percentsaythe laws Enacting a 30-day waiting period for all gun sales 75 24 1 covering the sale of firearms should be made stricter. Requiring all privately-owned guns to be registered with the police 70 29 1 FAVORABILITY TOWARD A COMPANY WITH DIFFERENT ANTI-GUN VIOLENCE INITIATIVES 72% 71% % Selected Somewhat More or Much More Favorable The American public DEM, IND, 52% would feel more favorable REP, and 41% 41% 39% 39% 38% toward a company that GUN actively supported gun OWNERS safety laws, funded gun are all more safety education, and/or favorable prohibited customers Actively supported Funded No longer allowed Reduced the Reduced the No longer offered No longer did No longer did bringing guns into stores. gun safety laws educational customers to bring amount of amount of member discounts business with gun business with gun programs to guns into its stores business they do business they do to the National manufacturers retailers promote gun safety or locations with gun retailers with gun Rifle Association manufacturers (NRA) Sources: Gallup; Edelman

Business can do more to protect, employees, consumers, and communities Many companies see the issue of gun violence as falling outside their sphere of responsibility and influence. However, companies have a responsibility to provide safe working environments for their employees—something they cannot reasonably guarantee given the current state of gun violence in the U.S. Gun violence happens in all types of workplaces and in the communities where companies operate and sell to. Sadly, gun violence is increasingly impacting more communities around the country.

Investors have taken interest in companies' Several investors and organizations working with connections to the gun violence value chain investors have integrated gun violence related issues into their portfolio management. ICCR Statement and As You Sow Institutional Investors Action • The Interfaith Center on Corporate • As You Sow is a U.S.-based non-profit that • CalSTRS and State Street Global Advisors, Responsibility (ICCR) use shareholder works to promote environmental and social among others, came together in a coalition of advocacy to press companies on corporate responsibility through shareholder institutional and private investors with environmental, social, and governance advocacy, coalition building, and innovative combined assets of more than $4.83 trillion to issues, including human rights issues. legal strategies. create and promote the Principles for a • In 2018, the ICCR released an Investor • Their Guns Free Funds is made for people Responsible Civilian Firearms Industry. Statement on Gun Violence, looking to align their investments with their • BlackRock asks questions to civilian firearms identifying 13 actions companies can adopt values by moving money out of companies manufacturers and retailers in effort to drive to reduce the risk of gun violence, many of that make and sell guns. They have also change. These questions include: them adapted from the Sandy Hook developed a Guns Free Action Toolkit to • What steps do you take to support the safe Principles. support employees to advocate their company and responsible use of your products? • The statement was endorsed by 142 to move to a guns-free 401(k). • What licensing do you have for your gun investors representing US$634 billion in sales? managed assets.

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Consumer pressure is increasing on Consumers are becoming more aware of how companies to take action on gun violence companies intersect with gun violence and using their influence to encourage companies to take action. First National Bank of JUST Capital Omaha & Enterprise Groceries, Not Guns Holdings • JUST Capital is an independent nonprofit • For more than a decade, the First National • Moms Demand Action began the “Groceries, that tracks, analyzes, and engages with large Bank of Omaha issued what its ads described Not Guns” campaign to target Kroger, one corporations and their investors on how they as the “Official Credit Card of the NRA”. of the largest grocery chains in America. perform on the public’s priorities. • Enterprise Holdings, which operates • Kroger supported a U.S. law that would allow • JUST Capital surveys Americans across the Enterprise, Alamo, and National Car, people to bring loaded guns in stores. United States to understand what they previously provided a member benefit to NRA Receipts showing over $250,000 in lost believe U.S. companies should prioritize members in the form of savings on car Kroger revenue, as a result of boycotts, most when it comes to just business rentals. were posted by consumers at behavior. Protecting the health and safety • Following the Parkland shooting, both the Groceriesnotguns.com in the first 48 hours of of workers “beyond what is required by First National Bank of Omaha and Enterprise the campaign alone. law” was a top priority for Americans in Holdings separately cut their ties with the • Kroger has since changed its policies and 2021. They also run focus groups to explore NRA and stopped providing benefits to NRA asks that customers to not bring guns into specific issues such as fair wages, members – they reported that customer their stores. gig/contract work, or caregiving. feedback caused them to review their relationships with the NRA.

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01 Dick’s Sporting Goods ended sales of all assault-style rifles in its stores in 2018, would no longer sell high-capacity Companies magazines, and would require any gun buyer to be at least 21 years of age, regardless of local laws. Dick’s also announced it will remove firearms from many of its stores. Have Taken 02 Walmartdoes not sell any firearm to anyone under 21 years of age and no longer sells assault-style rifles. After the Action To Keep shooting at a Walmart in El Paso, the company announced additional measures to keep its associates and employees safe, including discontinuing sales of short-barrel rifle ammunition, discontinuing handgun ammunition, and Communities discontinuing handgun sales in Alaska, marking a complete exit from handguns. 03 Levi Strauss & Co. established The Safer Tomorrow Fund to direct philanthropic grants to nonprofits and youth Safe (1/2) activists who are working to end gun violence in America and partners with Everytown for Gun Safety and executives from the business community. Levi’s also made a request to customers not to bring guns into stores and pledged CEO support for H.R. 8 to require background checks on all gun sales. Everytown For Gun Safety (2018) 04 L.L. Bean no longer sells guns or ammunition to anyone under the age of 21 (firearms specific to hunting and target shooting are only sold at its flagship store in Maine). 05 Kroger announced that it will not sell guns at its stores to people under 21. 06 REI, which does not sell guns, said it will stop ordering brands owned by Vista Outdoor until Vista Outdoor reconsiders its policies for its firearm brands. 07 Citibank released a U.S. commercial firearms policy that requires retail sector clients or partners to abide by several best practices prohibiting the sale of firearms without a completed background check, high-capacity magazines, and firearms to purchasers under the age of 21. 08 Bank of America stopped lending money to gun manufacturers that make military-style firearms for civilian use.

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Companies 09 Amalgamated Bank does not lend to or bank for firearms manufacturers or sellers and has a robust policy on firearms. Have Taken 10 BlackRock took steps to address the issue of firearms companies in index portfolios by engaging with firearms manufacturers and retailers regarding business policies and practices and offering clients a choice of products that Action To Keep exclude the firearms industry. Communities 11 State Street Global Advisors and the California State Teachers’ Retirement System (CalSTRS), with other institutional and private investors with combined assets of more than $4.83 trillion, came together to create and promote the Safe (2/2) Principles for a Responsible Civilian Firearms Industry. 12 PayPal does not allow the use of its service or logo for selling firearms, certain firearm parts, or ammunition. Everytown For Gun Safety (2018) 13 Authorize.net (a subsidiary of Visa) cut its relationship with North Carolina-based Hyatt Gun Shop – the self-proclaimed nation’s largest gun store. 14 Facebook limits posts on Facebook and Instagram discussing the sale of firearms to users over 18; warns people promoting the private sale of weapons to comply with relevant laws; and introduced “in-app education” on Instagram for those who search for gun promotions or sales. Facebook also banned users from coordinating private sales of firearms on Facebook and Instagram. 15 Salesforce changed its acceptable-use policy to ban customers that sell automatic and semiautomatic weapons, 3D- printed guns, and various accessories from using its sales management software. 16 TOMS, the shoe company, launched a campaign to end gun violence with a $5 million commitment to the issue.

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Gun Violence is a Human The UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs) clearly state companies’ responsibilities to ensure businesses operate with respect for human Rights Issue rights. When it comes to human rights impacts related to gun violence, business may cause, contribute, or be directly linked to the violation. UN Guiding Principle 13 states that How gun manufacturers and related companies may be business enterprises have a linked to human rights abuses responsibility to respect human rights, which entails that companies should: 1. A company may cause an adverse human rights impact through a company’s own actions or failure to act, for example by failing to prevent the adverse impact of accidental deaths from guns. 2. A company may contribute to an adverse human rights impact • Avoid causing or contributing to adverse through its own activities if it fails to incorporate prudent gun safety human rights impacts through their own technology in the development of its products. activities and address such impacts when they 3. A company may be directly linked to an adverse human rights occur. impact – impacts linked to the company’s products, services, or operations through a business relationship, without the company having contributed to the harm. This could be selling firearms to someone who then supplies the firearm to someone who comments commits violence against civilians against the local legislation. • Seek to prevent or mitigate adverse human rights impacts that are directly linked to their operations, products, or services by their Given the clear impacts of gun violence on human rights, business relationships, even if they have not including the right to life, companies should address gun violence contributed to those impacts. as part of their responsibility to protect human rights. Sources: UNGPs; John Ruggie Comments on Implications of UNGPs

A Framework for 02 Corporate Action to End Gun Violence

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A Framework for Corporate This framework is designed to support companies to take external and Action to End Gun Violence internal actions throughout company value chains to end gun violence and respect human rights. INTERNAL ACTIONS EXTERNAL ACTIONS Workforce Community & Engagement Operations Products Policy & Services & Advocacy * Adapted from BSR’s Healthy Business Coalition Framework

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INTERNAL ACTIONS: Workforce & Operations, Products & Services An average of 38,826 Companies have a responsibility to keep people die each year in employees safe from external violence. Promoting the U.S. due to gun gun safety internally could strengthen survivor violence – it is likely that support for impacted employees, prepare members of a workforces for experiencing gun violence (i.e., company’s workforce parking lot policies), and decrease the likelihood will be impacted directly of gun violence taking place within a company or indirectly by gun (i.e., secure storage programs). violence. All companies, whether or Companies should conduct due diligence to not they have brick and assess risks to people, including in their own mortar locations, make up operations and through the provision of products part of a value chain, or and services. In addition, the way a company employ workers who will positions itself with respect to marketing and be impacted by gun advertising, and products and services offered safety laws. sends a message about values to consumers and business partners.

EXTERNAL ACTIONS: Community Engagement, Policy & Advocacy Gun violence occurs across the U.S. Many As an essential part of community of the country’s largest cities, including engagement, companies can participate in New York, Philadelphia, and Chicago violence intervention programs, including have seen sharp rises in gun violence by partnering with local advocates, residents, over the past year, particularly in survivors, and governments – many of marginalized neighborhoods. A review of which may also be part of company crime statistics among the nation's 50 workforces and customer bases largest cities by the Wall Street Journal found that reported homicides were up 24% in 2021. Gun safety legislation is consistently Companies should engage with local, state, debated at the local, state, and federal and federal advocacy efforts to demonstrate levels, providing opportunities for support for eliminating gun violence and companies to advocate for gun safety at provide perspectives from the private multiple entry points. This includes sector on how gun violence impacts legislation on waiting periods, background operations and workforces. checks, secure storage, concealed carry, and the Charleston Loophole, issues which have wide support amongst Americans.

Taking 03 Action

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Gun Violence Value Chain Business Activities Types of Businesses Involved • Credit/loans to gun manufacturers or retailers • Consumer and business banks • Credit/loans to individuals who buys guns • Investors How guns are financed • Processing of transactions to buy guns • Third-party payment processors (e.g., • Insuring gun manufacturers; Underwriting issuances by gun online payment systems) manufacturers • Real estate investing / holdings leased by gun manufacturers • Gun or gun-related products manufacturers • Manufacturing Companies’ How guns are made • R&D in guns and weapons (i.e., making guns safer, smarter gun • Web services safes) • Research and development products, • Ghost guns, 3D printers, and online information related to gun operations violence • Retailers (online and in-person) selling guns, gun-related • Direct gun retailers and accessories, or facilitating the sale of guns • Dealers & other indirect gun retailers How guns are distributed • Retailers (online and in-person) selling materials that promote gun selling products associated with gun employees violence (e.g., t-shirts with guns printed on them) violence • Dealer/Distribution chains of guns and related products (storage, • Web services may intersect educational materials, etc.) • Advertisements for guns and gun-related goods (print and online) • Retail with the gun • Portrayals of gun violence in film and TV • Media violence value How gun violence is • Messaging around gun safety, educational campaigns, PSAs • Tech promoted • Online content by individual users through social media • Schools chain at • NRA partnerships and discounts • Any sector can form partnerships with organizations or on topics perpetuate multiple or work to end gun violence • In retail and service locations, hotels, transportation where • All companies are at risk of points employees, business partners, and consumers interact experiencing gun violence Where gun violence • In offices, factories, distribution centers, etc. happens • At supplier and business partners’ locations • When employees are commuting to work • In the communities where companies operate and source from Even if your company does not directly source guns or gun-related products, a supplier may be providing them for other companies, a retailer may be selling them, or a marketing partner may be promoting them.

The following section shows actions that companies can take as divided into 4 stages, from most Stages of nascent (Stage 1), to most advanced (Stage 4). Each section has a table (example below) showing recommended actions by stage. Once a company has completed the actions in one stage, we Action recommend continuing to onto the next stage and addressing those recommended actions. Stage Action Business Function Activities and Resources 1 Companies who are beginning their efforts to address human rights, and social issues such as gun violence should focus on actions recommended under Stages 1 and 2. Gun violence is a human rights 2 issue. Thus, all companies regardless of maturity should be taking steps to address how they may be directly/ indirectly 3 linked to human rights abuses Companies with more advanced human rights and social stemming from gun violence. strategies should aim to take actions under Stages 3 and 4. 4

Internal Actions: Workforce and Operations Stage Action Business Function Activities and Resources Review Employee Health and Human Resources, Employee • Establish mechanisms to report behavior linked to gun violence or guns on company property Safety (EHS) policies to Health and Safety (if not allowed), this can be designating someone in HR as a central person to monitor threats ensure gun safety provisions and risks. are included to keep • Undertake a risk assessment to understand the potential threats of gun violence impacting employees safe. employees, including looking at state laws. • The Everytown States Pages provide an overview of state gun laws. Develop resources for Human Resources • Provide information on access to different services, including access to mental health 1 employees who have been services. impacted by gun violence. • Provide paid leave for victims of gun violence. • Establish support groups or access to existing support groups, such as the Everytown Survivor Network. • Provide financial support to victims of gun violence. Ensure human rights Human Resources, Employee • Align human rights commitments with UNGPs, including developing or aligning commitments commitments are aligned with Engagement, Human Rights on protecting workforce from gun violence with broader human rights commitments. existing global standards. Provide volunteer Human Resources, Employee • Support employees and ERGs to recognize National Gun Violence Awareness Day and Wear opportunities for employees Engagement Orangeto demonstrate support for gun violence prevention. related to gun violence • Support employees to volunteer with organizations who support non-violent conflict resolution prevention. organizations, gun safety organizations, organizations supporting domestic violence victims, 2 suicide prevention, etc. Support Employee Resource Human Resources, Employee • Provide ERGs with resources related to gun violence and gun safety, such as safe storage Groups (ERGs) to discuss gun Engagement information and trainings. safety and recognize national • Encourage ERGs to participate in National Gun Violence Awareness Day. events. • Support ERGs to understand how their specific community is impacted by gun violence (i.e., suicide, domestic violence, homicide, etc.).

Internal Actions: Workforce and Operations Stage Action Business Function Activities and Resources Raise awareness with Human Resources, Employee • Hold employee training sessions on safe storage and gun safety education. employees on gun safety, Engagement • Provide resources to employees on safe storage and gun safety education from external including safe storage and gun organizations if needed, such as BeSmart, and One Thing You Can Do which provides state- safety education and training. specific information. Review employee benefits Human Resources, Benefits • Review As You Sow’s Guns Free Funds to ensure investments are not going to companies plan to ensure 401K and other that make and sell guns. 3 investment plans are gun-free. Ensure company efforts to Human Resources, Employee • Review resources provided to employees and ensure gun violence prevention is incorporated. address mental health, Health and Safety • Provide information to all employees about the heightened risks of suicide domestic violence wellbeing, and intimate partner related to guns and information on services/hotlines for victims. violence integrate gun safety • Review partner organizations to support employees and include groups with experience measures. working with gun violence victims. Define a policy of zero Human Resources • Draft a policy of zero tolerance towards firearms in and on company facilities, for example, tolerance towards firearms in following the template developed by Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), as and on company facilities (with legally allowed, that prohibits employees from bringing guns on company property. focus on employees). • OR Integrate zero tolerance towards firearms into existing workplace health and safety 4 policies, as legally allowed. • Share the policy with all employees. Define accountability for Human Resources, Senior • Ensure senior-level accountability to implement the policy. implementing zero-tolerance leadership • Establish regular internal and external reporting and include gun violence prevention policy. measures in annual public reporting.

Internal Actions: Workforce and Operations Stage Action Business Function Activities and Resources Review policies to ensure gun Human Resources, Workplace • Establish mechanisms to report behavior linked to gun violence or guns on company property, safety provisions include Health and Safety, Retail with a focus on customers. 1 company operations (i.e., Operations • Undertake a risk assessment to understand the potential threats of gun violence impacting retail locations, warehouses, operations, including looking at state laws. This can include reviewing company policies that etc.) allow, or prohibit customers carrying guns into retail facilities, warehouses, and other areas operation, as relevant. Use social media and Communications, Workplace • Issue a statement outlining the company’s position on gun safety in operations (looking to communications channels to Health and Safety company statementsfrom Kroger’s, Walmart, and others). raise awareness of gun safety • Develop a social media campaign to raise awareness about the company’s position on gun 2 policies and practices among safety among customers (i.e., banning customers from bringing guns into stores). This can customers. include details on why company action is critical for reducing gun violence. • Develop communications materials for distribution at relevant operations (i.e., stores, warehouses, etc.). Define a policy of zero Human Resources • Draft a policy of zero tolerance towards firearms in and on company facilities, for example, tolerance towards firearms in following the template developed by Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), as and on company facilities. legally allowed, that prohibits employees from bringing guns on company property. • OR Integrate zero tolerance towards firearms into existing workplace health and safety policies, as legally allowed. 3 • Share the policy with all employees. Define accountability for Human Resources, Senior • Ensure senior-level accountability to implement the policy. implementing zero-tolerance leadership • Establish regular internal and external reporting and include gun violence prevention policy. measures in annual public reporting.

Internal Actions: Products and Services Stage Action Business Function Activities and Resources Evaluate where products Brands, Procurement, • Undertake an assessment of business activities to understand where your company’s and services intersect Marketing products and services intersect with the gun violence value chain. Consider the with the gun violence following questions: value chain. • Do you manufacture or sell guns or gun accessories? • Do you source from suppliers that manufacture guns or gun accessories? • Do you manufacture or sell gun-related accessories? • Do you have brand partnerships with organizations that promote unsafe gun use? • Do you provide services that enable companies or individuals to make, buy, or sell guns? • Do you have operations where gun violence could occur? See the Industry Deep Dives section for sector-specific details. 1 Ensure human rights Human Rights, Compliance • Conduct human rights due diligence of all operations to assess priority human rights due diligence includes risks, including gun violence. gun violence. • Identify and assess those real and potential adverse human rights impacts across operations; • Based on the assessment, identify steps and to address those human rights impacts; • Define clear policies and processes to prevent and mitigate human rights risks • For example: publicly available responsible sourcing policies that clearly communicate human rights expectations; a responsible gun use policy that clearly stipulates due diligence expectations of its business suppliers, including retailers; a responsible marketing code of conduct that prohibits marketing strategies that target children.

Internal Actions: Products and Services Stage Action Business Function Activities and Resources Identify opportunities to Brands, Procurement, • Establish an internal task force to explore options to separate products and operations separate products and Marketing from gun violence value chain. operations from gun • Assess suppliers to understand where they intersect with the gun violence value chain. violence value chain (i.e., identifying alternative business partners, alternative sourcing practices, etc.). 2 Develop an action plan Brands, Procurement, • Develop an action plan to separate products and operations from gun violence value to dissociate products Marketing chain. This can include: and operations from • Stop allowing guns in company restaurants, stores, and places of operation. intersection points with • If you sell guns, commit to stop selling assault-style rifles and high-capacity gun violence. magazines, and to stop selling guns to anyone under 21. • Stop providing financial services to cover purchases of assault weapons, bump stocks, and other products that contribute to gun violence. • If a B2B service/product provider, ban customers that sell automatic and semiautomatic weapons, high-capacity magazines, and 3D-printed guns. • Establish a roadmap and time frame to implement the strategy. • Work with suppliers to separate products and operations from gun violence value chain.

Internal Actions: Products and Services Stage Action Business Function Activities and Resources Integrate gun R&D, Brands, Marketing • Develop products and services, as relevant to the company, that respond violence prevention to the company’s intersections with the gun violence value chain. This in products and may include promotional materials for community initiatives and gun marketing. safety partnerships in areas of company product/services distribution. 3 • If relevant, consider how products related to guns could be made safer, such as gun safes and identification locks. Define a policy of a Brands, Procurement, • Track potential KPIs including: value chain free Marketing, • Number of suppliers who have committed to a gun violence-free value from gun violence, Sustainability/ESG chain. including reporting • Number of intersection points with the gun violence value chains (i.e., management to products, partnerships, services, etc.). 4 support implementation and • Stop procuring from companies that manufacture guns. relevant targets and • Stop manufacturing and selling guns and gun accessories. KPIs. • If a B2B service/product provider, ban customers that manufacture or sell guns.

External Actions: Community Engagement Stage Action Business Function Activities and Resources Support and partner with existing civil Sustainability, Employee - Conduct outreach with potential local partners on gun violence society organizations in local Engagement, Community prevention. communities working on gun safety and Engagement, Foundation - Review company-wide and due diligence engagement programs to ending gun violence and conduct include long-term partnerships with gun violence prevention outreach. organizations. Potential partners include: - Everytown for Gun Safety - a movement of Americans working together 1 to end gun violence and build safer communities. They focus on reform in four main areas: background checks, domestic violence, preventable Consult with civil society organizations as deaths, and gun trafficking. part of Human Rights Due Diligence - Community Justice Action Fund - addresses the issue of gun violence in a holistic, sustainable, and intersectional manner, galvanizing the power of the people most affected by the pain to inform solutions that effectively tackle the root causes of gun violence. Their strategy focuses on a policy agenda, building a network of leaders, and training opportunities to prevent everyday gun violence. Support employee donations to gun Sustainability, Employee - Implement corporate giving and donation matching schemes that are violence prevention organizations Engagement, Community reviewed to ensure programs exclude organizations that promote gun 2 through corporate giving and donation Engagement, Foundation violence. matching schemes. - Encourage employee and leadership participation in local civil society initiatives on gun safety. Leverage existing partnerships to Sustainability, Employee National Coalition Against Domestic Violence – a national organization 3 address gun violence (i.e., domestic Engagement, Community dedicated to supporting survivors of domestic violence. violence, mental health, etc.) Engagement, Foundation Active Minds – national nonprofit supporting mental health awareness and education for young adults, with a focus on suicide prevention.

External Actions: Policy and Advocacy Stage Action Business Function Activities and Resources Participate in national and Public Policy, Government - When state and federal governments debate gun violence-related legislation, state-level sign-on letters to Relations participate in sign-on letters to support gun safety regulations, such as universal support gun safety regulations. background checks, permit requirements, and high-capacity magazine restrictions. 1 Support research to Social Impact, Foundation - Partner with gun violence prevention organizations to undertake research on where understand how companies industry value chains intersect with gun violence and how companies can effectively can effectively address gun address gun violence across their value chain or within a specific industry. violence across their value - Participate in National Gun Violence Awareness Day (June 4) by supporting Wear chain. Orange to demonstrate support for the gun violence prevention movement. Support state- and federal- Public Policy, Government - Engage with state and federal advocacy groups working to end gun violence to stay up level gun safety legislation. Relations to date on changes in legislation. Ensure senior leadership is Senior leadership, - Develop talking points for senior leaders to speak out against gun violence. vocal on support for gun safety Communications, Social Media - Leverage social media and communications to speak out against gun violence, for 2 legislation. example, on National Gun Violence Prevention Day. Collaborate with other Senior Leadership, Policy and - Join senior-level company advocacy initiatives, such as the CEO letter from companies and stakeholders to Advocacy September 2019: 145 CEOs from some of America’s most recognizable companies advocate for gun safety at (including Airbnb, Conde Nast, Uber, and others) came together to sign an open letter state and federal levels. to the U.S. Senate, urging Congress to take immediate action on gun safety measures. Review political contributions Government Relations ‒ Review candidates and elected representatives’ positions on gun violence issues such to ensure they support as universal background checks, permit requirements, and high-capacity magazine 3 representatives that are in restrictions. favor of gun safety regulations. ‒ The company prohibits lobbying efforts aimed to prevent/hinder the development of gun safety technologies, responsible gun regulations, and efforts to reduce legal barriers to access remedy for adverse human rights impacts associated to firearms

Policy and Advocacy High-level Policy Guide There are many policy issues at the local, state, and national levels related to gun violence. Below is a selection of policy solutions to gun violence which companies should consider supporting as well as links with more information. Downloadable / Responsible Background Accountability Community Assault-Style Ghost Guns Gun Ownership Checks for the Gun Safety Weapons Industry • Companies should not • Promote secure gun • Background checks are • Strengthen regulations for • Prohibit open carry – often • Prohibit assault-style facilitate the sale of ghost storage– to reduce risk of required for gun sales by gun dealers– updating exploited by members of weapons–exceptionally guns(i.e., facilitating unintentional shootings and licensed gun dealers, but practices for storage, record hate groups to intimidate deadly firearms payments for ghost gun suicides. not for guns sold by keeping, training, etc. others. commonplace in mass parts, hosting 3D printing • Promote gun owner safety unlicensed sellers (i.e., • The Protection of Lawful • Repeal stand your ground shootings. files for downloadable training – to ensure sellers of guns online, at Commerce in Arms Act laws – which encourage • Prohibit bump stocks – guns), which are designed education on responsible gun shows), enabling those (PLCAA) blocks legal avoidable escalations of conversion devices that and sold as a way to practices and storing. with felony convictions and responsibility for violence. create a loophole for circumvent gun laws, and domestic abuse restraining manufacturers, distributors, • Support sensitive area machine gun regulations. are popular among people orders to buy guns without and dealers with restrictions – for places prohibited from owning a background check. irresponsible, reckless and where children gather, firearms. • The Charleston Loophole negligent sales practices places that serve alcohol, allows gun sales if after that enable illegal firearms etc. three days the FBI has not distribution. • Require permits for concluded an investigation concealed carry – to into whether an individual is encourage responsible gun eligible to buy a gun. ownership.

Industry Deep 04 Dives Healthcare Retail Financial Media and Technology Services and Services Social Media Facilities

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Industry Deep Dives Healthcare Services and Facilities

Industry Deep Dive | Healthcare Rising violent death Public Health Approach to Gun Violence Prevention Public Health Cost of Gun Violence rates in the United States, driven by • Hospital Based Violence Intervention Programs: • Violence raises the demand for health services. increasing firearm there is a unique window of opportunity to engage About 2.3 million people in 2017 were treated in homicide and suicide, victims of gun violence in the immediate aftermath of emergency rooms for violent injuries. put attention on the role a traumatic injury. Programs located in trauma the healthcare sector centers and emergency departments can engage plays in prevention and patients while they are still in the hospital to reduce • Estimates of the cost of gun violence vary. Recent intervention. the change of retaliation or the recurrence of studies find that between 2006 and 2014, the violence. average annual cost of initial inpatient This section will focus hospitalizations for gunshot wounds was $734.6 on Healthcare Services • Medical Counseling on Access to Lethal million (based on hospital costs). and Facilities – Means:Physicians and other medical professionals hospitals, healthcare are crucial sources of information about the risk of • Others find that the estimated the average providers, congregant firearm access. By asking their patients about firearm emergency department and inpatient charges for living, etc. access and counseling them about firearm suicide the same period at $2.8 billion per year (based on risk, medical professionals can help prevent these charges). deaths. Sources: Educational Fund to Stop Gun Violence; Northwell Health; American Psychological Association

Healthcare | Intersections with the Gun Violence Value Chain How gun violence is promoted Where gun violence happens Healthcare companies play an important role in positioning Gun violence can take place anywhere. Healthcare gun violence as a public health issue. These include companies have a role to play in enacting policies that hospital-based violence interruption and medical protect their employees and customers both online and counseling on access to lethal means. in-person. All healthcare facilities should be gun-free zones.

Healthcare | Actions to Promote Gun Safety Given the intersections with how guns are made and distributed and how gun violence is promoted and where it occurs, Healthcare companies should consider the following actions. STAGE 1 STAGE 2 STAGE 3 STAGE 4 • Consider how your company • Develop action plan to • Contribute to research that • Develop awareness-raising intersects with the gun implement services that makes gun violence a public campaigns within communities violence supply chain prevent gun violence, this health issue around gun violence • Make healthcare facilities gun- could include safe storage • Cost and impacts prevention, safe storage, etc. free guidance and additional measurements • Develop community-level goals • Ensure mental health services, prevention efforts related to gun violence (e.g., suicide prevention efforts, • Develop partnerships with reduction in number of gun- pediatric services among mental health services and related incidents) others understand, and local organizations to prevent address the risks of guns gun violence (e.g., conflict resolution organizations and gun violence interrupters

Healthcare | Promoting Best Practices on Gun Violence Reduction Kaiser Permanente is the largest nonprofit, integrated health system in the U.S. In 2019 they pledged to fund 3 clinical research studies focusing on how clinicians can help prevent firearm injuries—including suicide, intimate partner violence, and accidents—as part of its pledge to invest $2 million to prevent gun injuries and deaths. Proposed Clinical Research Studies • Evaluating a web-based education tool for safe firearm storage in patients at risk for suicide – Kaiser Permanente Colorado Institute for Health Research. The research funds accompany the • Understanding risk factors of firearm-related injuries and death in adult and formation of Kaiser Permanente’s pediatric populations: Risk prediction and opportunities for prevention – Firearm Injury Prevention Task Force. Kaiser Permanente Southern California Department of Research & Evaluation. The initiative’s goal is to understand what the best practices • Integration of firearm suicide-prevention tools in health care settings: currently are, to investigate new Patient-reported access to firearms and decision aid for storing firearms. ones, and to standardize practices grounded in evidence and show demonstrated effectiveness. Sources: Kaiser Permanente

Healthcare | Collaboration for Gun Violence Prevention Northwell Health created the Center for Gun Violence Prevention—an initiative calling for the critical need to implement evidence-based firearm injury and mortality prevention strategies in health care, especially within at-risk communities. The objectives of the collaborative are • Provide a platform for sustained dialogue on gun violence as a public health issue, providing an opportunity to showcase the work of health care industry leaders. • Mobilize all layers of the Healthcare Industry to develop a community of support to Under its Center for Gun Violence explore mentorship, partnerships, and opportunities for system-level workflows and Prevention, Northwell Health has protocols. created the Learning • Spur action with a multi-year, phased approach hinging on exploration, implementation, Collaborative for Health Systems and evaluation. Participants will commit to the growth of the learning community by and Hospitals. completing pre-/post-evaluations, sharing learnings, and disseminating best practices to their home institutions. I firmly believe that health care leaders have a social responsibility to try to stop the mindless bloodshed caused by firearms-related Northwell President and CEO violence in this country, just as we respond aggressively to health Michael Dowling. “ crises like vaping, the flu, or the new coronavirus that is causing worldwide panic.

Industry Deep Dives Retail

Industry Deep Dive | Retail Retail companies are on the on the frontline of gun violence and prevention, as brick and mortar shops are common locations for guns to be sold and for gun violence to take place. Moms Demand Action has led a number of campaigns targeting retail stores, encouraging them to enact policies and practices that encourage gun safety are fundamental to keep retail Despite having banned smoking 25 feet from all locations, it was still allowed to bring armed weapons into Starbucks employees, customers, and stores. Moms Demand Action began a campaign, asking consumers to skip visits to Starbucks once week with the communities safe. One “Skip Starbucks Saturday” initiative. The Moms Demand Action community increased more than 10% during the “Skip example of those campaigns, Starbucks Saturday” campaign, from 105,458 to 117,027. focused on Starbucks is shared below. Sources: Moms Demand Action; Newsweek

Retail | Intersections with the Gun Violence Value Chain How guns are How guns are How gun Where gun made distributed violence is violence promoted happens Retail companies with their Distributors of guns and Gun violence may be Gun violence can take place own brands may have direct firearms often carry other promoted through images, anywhere, including locations and indirect ties with gun consumer goods. Retailers can words, and themes can be where consumer goods are manufacturers, as gun enhance their gun safety proliferated on t-shirts, games, sold, which makes it vital for manufacturers can be related regulations; and consumer advertising, and other companies to define policies to companies selling a variety goods companies can exert avenues. and protections for their of products aside from guns pressure on retailers to speak Lobbying local and federal workforce and customers and firearms (i.e., parent or out. lawmakers to enact legislation against gun violence. subsidiary companies). promoting gun safety is another way for consumer goods companies to positively use their influence.

Retail | Actions to Promote Gun Safety Given the intersections with how guns are made and distributed, and how gun violence is promoted and where it occurs, Retail companies should consider the following actions. STAGE 1 STAGE 2 STAGE 3 STAGE 4 Evaluate where products and Develop action plan to eliminate Integrate gun violence prevention Define a policy of a value chain services intersect with the gun products that encourage gun in products and marketing free from gun violence, including violence value chain violence • Develop products and services management to support • Assess own operations (i.e., • Prohibit carrying of guns and that respond to the company’s implementation and relevant gun/accessories firearms in retail locations intersections with the gun targets and KPIs manufacturing, • Remove imagery that violence value chain gun/accessories distribution) promotes gun violence from • Provide educational materials • Assess supplier relationships stores (i.e., t-shirts, posters) about gun safety and offer gun to understand where suppliers • Prohibit sales of assault-style locks and parent/subsidiary rifles, high-capacity • Use social media and companies may intersect magazines, and gun sales to communication channels to anyone under 21 years old and promote gun safety require background checks for all gun sales

Retail | Restricting Gun Violence from Taking Place Subway and Starbucks revised company policies to disallow customers from being allowed to openly carry in their restaurants, following consumer pressure on these companies to enhance safety precautions for their workforce and customers. Starbucks asks customers not to Subway asks all guests to refrain from open carry of firearms in its stores. bring guns into its stores. Sources: Subway; Business Insider; Travis Long, Twitter

Retail | Promoting Gun Safety Levi Strauss & Co. uses its voice as a global company to speak out against gun. They established The Safer Tomorrow Fund to direct philanthropic grants to nonprofits and youth activists who are working to end gun violence in America and partners with Everytown for Gun Safety and executives from the business community. Levi’s also made a request to customers not to bring guns into stores and pledged CEO support for H.R. 8 to require background checks on all gun sales. Levi's: Gun Violence Prevention

Retail | Reviewing Supplier Relationships that Intersect with Gun Violence In 2018, REI suspended its relationship with Vista Outdoor, the parent company for Savage Arms which manufactures guns, “including modern sporting rifles”. Given Vista Outdoor’s silence on gun safety and failure to support common sense gun safety solutions, REI placed a hold on Vista Outdoor’s subsidiary companies (Giro, Bell, CamelBak, Blackburn and Camp Chef). In 2019, Vista Outdoor secured a buyer for Savage Arms and REI announced it would resume orders with the company's subsidiaries. REI: Statement on Relationship with Vista Outdoor

Retail | Changing Policies to Respond to Gun Violence Taking Place Dick’s pulled guns out of 10 stores and filled the empty space with products targeted for those markets, such as sports team merchandise. Those 10 stores outperformed the rest of the chain. In March 2018, Dick’s said it was pulling all guns from 125 of its roughly 730 total stores. Dick’s has now pulled guns from over 400 stores. Dick’s Sporting Goods Following the 2018 Parkland Shooting, Dick’s Sporting Goods, which is a gun retailer, overhauled its gun policies. These include: • Pulling all assault-style weapons from its stores • Banning high-capacity magazines and "bump stocks" (that can convert semiautomatic weapons into machine guns) • Prohibiting sale of firearms to people under 21 Washington Post: Dick's Sporting Goods Gun Policy Overhaul

Retail | Changing Policies to Respond to Gun Violence Taking Place In 2018, following the Parkland mass shooting, Walmart made some policy changes to its gun sales in favor of gun safety: • Raising the age for purchasing a gun in its stores from 18 to 21 • Declining to sell bump stocks • Requiring gun buyers to pass background checks • Asking customers not to openly carry guns into its stores In 2019, following a mass shooting at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, Walmart made further policy changes, including: • Discontinuing sales of short-barrel rifle ammunition such as the 223 caliber and 5.56 caliber that, while commonly used in some hunting rifles, can also be used in large capacity clips on military-style weapons • Discontinuing handgun ammunition • Discontinuing handgun sales in Alaska, marking a complete exit from handguns CNN: Walmart Gun Violence Restrictions

Industry Deep Dives Financial Services

Industry Deep Dive | Financial Services There are two publicly traded Bank of America announced in 2018 In the year following the Sandy Hook massacre in Newtown, firearms manufacturers: Sturm that it would stop lending money to Connecticut, shares in the publicly traded companies Sturm Ruger Ruger and Smith & Wesson. gun manufacturers who make and Smith & Wesson jumped more than 70%, benefiting Often without realizing it, military-style firearms for civilian institutional investors such as Vanguard, Blackrock, and Fidelity. institutional investors may be use. For the time being, Bank of connected to gun violence America continues to offer The tables below show the percentage of Vanguard’s and Fidelity’s fund through their investments in banking services to firearms assets that are composed of civilian firearms investments. gun manufacturing companies retailers, regardless of the firearms and distributors, insurance, and they carry, or of the retailers' gun safety policies. underwriting. For life insurance, risky avocations Gun manufacturers 168 $1.11B 0.02% Banks may also provide such as private aviation, scuba Manufacturers of civilian firearms holdings invested of fund assets commercial loans to gun diving, and rock climbing might be Vanguard companies, while financial considered in the underwriting Major gun retailers 131 $19.21B 0.35% services platforms like credit process, though firearm ownership Largest public retailers of civilian firearms holdings invested of fund assets cards and third-party payment generally is not. The death rate processors play a role in attributable to gun ownership is Fidelity Gun manufacturers 236 $1.15B 0.05% enabling sales and purchase of 46% higher than scuba diving Manufacturers of civilian firearms holdings invested of fund assets guns and firearms. (appx. 240 deaths per million gun Investment owners). Scuba is commonly used Major gun retailers 243 $4.54B 0.19% in insurance underwriting; gun Largest public retailers of civilian firearms holdings invested of fund assets ownership is not. Gun-Free Funds; NYT: BAC Gun Policy; Mother Jones: Gun Investors

Financial Services | Intersections with the Gun Violence Value Chain How guns are How guns are Where gun financed distributed violence happens Investors may have investments in gun Financial services platforms, such as credit Investors have the responsibility to manufacturers, distributors, and other card companies and third-party payment influence portfolio companies to undertake companies that are directly or indirectly platforms, enable guns and firearms to be due diligence that includes gun violence, linked to the gun violence supply chain. bought and sold. Adding background enact policies and protections that promote Often these links are hidden from public checks, geographical barriers (i.e., to gun safety and when pressure to change view – for example by including companies prohibit transactions at gun shows), and/or policies is met with resistance or lack of associated with gun violence in mutual age barriers (i.e., to prevent those under change, consider responsibly divesting funds, or by funding parent/subsidiary 21 from buying guns) can help to prevent from gun manufacturers. companies. Financial transactions like gun violence. Financial services companies should take loans, credit services, private equity steps to prevent gun violence from taking investment, insurance, underwriting, and place within their own operations. real estate holdings can also finance gun manufacturing and distribution, as well as sponsorship or co-branded credit cards with companies without good gun safety practices.

Financial Services | Actions to Promote Gun Safety Given the intersections with how guns are financed and distributed and where gun violence occurs, Financial Service companies should consider the following actions. STAGE 1 STAGE 2 STAGE 3 STAGE 4 Evaluate and disclose where Develop an action plan to Integrate gun violence prevention Define a policy of a value chain services intersect with the gun address gun violence in products and marketing free from gun violence, including violence value chain • Integrate gun violence in due • Develop products and management to support • Identify portfolio companies diligence processes and services, i.e., gun-free funds, implementation and relevant directly linked to gun codes of conduct payment blocks for anyone targets and KPIs violence (e.g., produce or • Encourage companies to halt under 21, geolocation distribute civilian or military activities that contribute to services that block firearms) gun violence purchases at unregulated • Identify portfolio companies • If engagement fails, gun shows indirectly linked to the gun responsibly divest from Prohibit lending to clients and violence value chain companies contributing to customers who manufacture gun violence (see next page and/or distribute guns for more information) • Absent gun safety policies (background checks, age minimums)

Financial Services | Portfolios Supporting Gun Safety In 2018, BlackRock unveiled a range of index products that would enable investors to withhold their support for gunmakers and sellers. BlackRock also began offering an option to take the guns out of institutional strategies tracking major market indexes, including the Standard & Poor’s 500, the Russell 2000, and three others. These changes were made largely following demands from their own customers. Following investor pressure from CalSTRS (which has $750 million invested in Cerberus), Cerberus Capital Management, a private equity firm, said that it would seek to sell off ownership of the Freedom Group (now Remington Outdoor) – the maker of the assault rifle used in the Sandy Hook massacre. NYT: Cerberus to sell Freedom Group; BlackRock: Approach to Firearms

Financial Services | Developing a Commercial Firearms Policy Citi Following the Parkland shooting in 2018, Citi instituted a U.S. Commercial Firearms Policy requiring new retail sector clients or partners to adhere to best practices, including: 1. They don’t sell firearms to someone who hasn’t passed a background check, 2. They restrict the sale of firearms for individuals under 21 years of age, and 3. They don’t sell bump stocks or high-capacity magazines Citi: Change to Commercial Firearms Policy

Financial Services | Investor Pressure Promoting Gun Safety CalSTRS A coalition of long-term, global institutional and private investors created the Principles for a Responsible Civilian Firearms Industry in 2018. The principles provide a framework for institutional investors seeking to improve engagement with public and private companies globally that manufacture, distribute, sell or regulate products within the civilian firearms industry to address gun safety issues. CalSTRS: Principles for Responsible Civilian Firearms

Financial Services | Responsible Divestment Gun Violence Responsible divestment is an approach that includes divestment decisions based on the assessment of corporate human rights performance, including progress over time, regardless of sector or operating context. If investors choose to divest from the gun violence value chain, they should do so responsibly. Why responsible divestment? • When an investor lacks sufficient leverage to change the behavior of an investee and is unable to influence the investee to address adverse human rights impacts, the investor may consider responsible How to responsibly divest : divestment. Companies may attempt to engage with other shareholders to increase their leverage. Those who divest from a • The UN Guiding Principles on Responsible Business Conduct state that a business relationship may have company are advised to issue to be terminated if efforts to exercise leverage aimed at addressing an adverse human rights impact a press release explaining prove unsuccessful. why, thereby imposing greater pressure on the company and • Divestment from a company may be an appropriate response after continuous failed attempts at creating leverage for others mitigating harm, where mitigation is unfeasible or because the severity of the adverse impact warrants it. who have not divested. • When considering whether to divest, investors should also assess whether ending the relationship with This can take place either the investee would result in adverse impacts. before or after divestment has been completed. • Divestment may not be appropriate in all cases because without investors engaging on human rights concerns, there is often no other voice persuading the company to change its practices. OHCHR: Taking stock of investor implementation of the UNGPs

Industry Deep Dives Media & Social Media

Industry Deep Dive | Media & Social Media Critics of media coverage recommend changes to coverage of mass A growing body of evidence disproves a causal shootings to alter the predictable news cycle that follows mass link between violent video games and gun shootings : violence events in the U.S. However, video games can serve as indirect advertisers for Mass media outlets have Alternating between “thoughts and prayers” rhetoric and the gun manufacturers. done little to influence perspective organizations opposing common sense gun safety in a way that hijacks balanced storytelling1 changes in the national discourse on gun violence. The approach to Focusing on the shooter may inspire or encourage others2 Electronic Arts (EA) reporting has called into licensed weapons from question the role of major McMillan Group in a media outlets in marketing collaboration promoting gun violence. Use media to show Americans the truth, remembering that for Medal of Honor: photojournalism of the Vietnam Warwas one of the most Warfighter. Media and social media effective ways to raise awareness among Americans and to companies should assess eventually stop the war3 how the content they promote, directly or indirectly contributes to the gun violence value chain. In the wake of the Sandy Hook massacre, EA said it would cut licensing ties with manufacturers – removing links to weapons companies and to gun magazines where gamers could view real versions of the weapons featured in their games. 1 2 3 Deakin University: Can the media change American attitudes to guns?; The Atlantic: Changes to the Post Massacre Ritual; ibid.

Industry Deep Dive | Media & Social Media Facebook Twitter References to gun violence have proliferated across different social media networks and platforms, often in reference to political exchanges, and in the context of hate speech. The word “gun” While many social media appears once in Neither “guns” nor “firearms” are companies have Facebook has other mentioned in Twitter’s policy on integrated gun violence Facebook’s policy Glorifications of Violence. However, on Violence and company policies Twitter’s advertising policy prohibits the prevention into some Incitement to that address gun promotion of weapons and weapon company policies, prohibit images safety – in its accessories. approaches are largely that show a gun to advertising policy, inconsistent. the head. and on prohibiting firearm sales on its marketplace.

Industry Deep Dive | Media & Social Media The tragic mass shooting Commitments from online at two mosques in service provides include: Christchurch, New Zealand killing 52 people • Take transparent, specific in 2019 was designed by measures to prevent the a white supremacist to go upload of terrorist and viral on social media The tragedy led to the A number of the biggest violent extremist content networks and was creation of the global social media and to prevent its broadcasted on Facebook Christchurch Call: a call companies have joined dissemination on social Live. for collaboration between the Christchurch Call. media, including governments, civil society, immediate and permanent The horrible event led to a and online service removal call to eliminate terrorist providers to eliminate • Provide greater and violent extremist terrorist and violent transparency in the setting content online. extremist content of community standards or online. terms of service

Media & Social Media | Intersections with the Gun Violence Value Chain How gun violence is promoted Where gun violence happens Major media and social media companies have been Gun violence can take place anywhere. Media and social criticized for failing to regulate dissemination of dangerous media companies have a role to play in enacting policies and extremist content linked to gun violence. that protect their employees and customers both online and in-person. Gun violence can be promoted through media discourse as well as through advertising and other avenues that directly and indirectly support gun violence.

Media & Social Media | Actions to Promote Gun Safety Given the intersections with how gun violence is promoted and where it occurs, media and social media companies should consider the following actions. STAGE 1 STAGE 2 STAGE 3 STAGE 4 Evaluate where intersections with Develop action plan to dissociate Integrate gun violence prevention Define a policy of a value chain the gun violence value chain products from gun violence in products and marketing free from gun violence, including • Assess content moderation, • Prohibit licensing, marketing, • Use platforms and services to management to support hate speech, and other policies and advertising with partners disseminate gun safety implementation and relevant for their inclusion of gun safety that promote gun violence practices and rhetoric targets and KPIs practices • Prohibit customers and clients • Assess partnerships with from using services and advertisers, marketers that platforms to promote gun contribute to the gun violence violence value chain • Prohibit on informal gun ads via influencer- sponsored posts • Prohibit distribution of files for downloadable guns • Consider controls for extremist content linked to gun violence • Institute processes to detect the use of social media platforms to promote gun violence

Media & Social Media | Preventing Distribution of Gun Violence Content Facebook In preparation for Joe Biden’s Inauguration in 2021, Facebook banned advertisements that promote weapon accessories and protective equipment in the U.S., primarily in response to the 2021 U.S. Capitol attack on January 6. Facebook had already prohibited advertisements for weapons, ammunition and weapon enhancements like silencers, and expanded this policy to include advertisements for accessories such as gun safes, vests and gun holsters in the U.S. Facebook: Preparing for Inauguration Day

Industry Deep Dives Technology

Industry Deep Dive | Tech As new technologies arise, tech companies Smart Guns & Safe Storage are designed to must be aware of how their products can directly provide access only to a firearm’s owner, or or indirectly support gun designated users, primarily using biometric violence, such as with the data (i.e., fingerprint) and Radio-Frequency distribution of gun Identification (RFID) (i.e., such as a building blueprints for 3D printers. access fob). Innovation in gun safety technology has accelerated in the wake of mass shootings. “A personalized—or “smart”—gun is a firearm that employs authorized-use technology, like the thumb scan or passcode available on many smartphones, to turn stolen guns and guns accessed by children into harmless pieces of steel. If widely implemented, it would be a game-changer for keeping guns out of the hands of children and criminals.” - Everytown Sources: Deakin Smart Tech Foundation: Gun Safety Tech; Time: Protective Tech for School Shootings; Forbes: Gun Distribution through Software

Tech | Intersections with the Gun Violence Value Chain How guns are How guns are How gun Outward made distributed violence is Impact promoted Tech can be used to Tech can be used to distribute Major tech and social media Gun violence can take place manufacture guns, including information on how to companies have been anywhere. Media & tech ghost guns that are purchase or manufacture criticized for failing to regulate companies have a role to play unregistered and therefore guns, including ghost guns. dissemination of dangerous in enacting policies that protect impossible to monitor or track. Logistics platforms can also be and extremist content that has their employees and used to foment gun been linked to gun violence. customers both online and in- distribution, including indirectly person. through partnerships. Gun violence can be promoted Downloadable / 3D printed through media discourse as guns can be distributed well as through advertising and through online files. other avenues that directly and indirectly support gun violence.

Tech | Actions to Promote Gun Safety Given the intersections with how guns are financed and distributed and where gun violence occurs, Tech companies should consider the following actions. STAGE 1 STAGE 2 STAGE 3 STAGE 4 Evaluate where intersections with Develop action plan to dissociate Integrate gun violence prevention Define a policy of a value chain the gun violence value chain products from gun violence in products and marketing free from gun violence, including • Assess hate speech and • Prohibit licensing, marketing, • Where relevant, innovate in management to support other policies for inclusion of and advertising with partners gun safety products, or implementation and relevant gun safety practices that promote gun violence disseminate information on targets and KPIs • Assess partnerships with • Prohibit customers and promoting gun safety in advertisers, marketers that clients from using services products and marketing contribute to the gun and platforms to promote gun violence value chain violence • Evaluate vendor relationships, screening clients for ties to gun industry • Create a Gun Safety Code of Conduct for clients and vendors

Tech | Promoting Gun Safety in Policies While the silence and inaction of some tech companies has been criticized by gun safety advocates, other tech companies have adapted their policies and practices to promote gun safety. Amazon Salesforce Acceptable Use and External-facing Services Policy Retailers like Amazon, eBay, and Salesforce have banned or Salesforce updated its Acceptable Use Policy to prohibit restricted sales of guns on their platforms. customers who use its software from selling firearms, including Salesforce reinforced its stance on preventing gun violence by banning semi-automatic weapons, 3D-printed guns, and large-capacity retailers that sell certain guns and ammunition from using its software. magazines. Sources: Salesforce: Acceptable Use Policy; Amazon: Seller Central; Forbes: Tech Preventing Gun Violence

Tech | Innovating to Block 3D Gun Manufacturing and Distribution Sculpteo • 3D printing technology has broadened the ability to manufacture a variety of products easily and cheaply. Unfortunately, firearms are one of the products which, due to the proliferation of blueprints for 3D printed guns online, have seen an uptick in production. • Major concerns about 3D printed guns included that they are untraceable as they do not have serial numbers, and undetectable by metal detectors as they are made of plastic. Further, enforcement of age restrictions and background checks is nearly impossible, given the lack of traceability of 3D printed guns. • In response to the release of blueprints for 3D printed guns, many 3D printing companies, including Sculpteo and Materialise have banned the printing of firearms and launched features to block the production of guns on their 3D printers. Sources:Sculpteo: Why we don't 3D Print Guns; The Trace: 3D Printed Guns

Reporting on Gun 05 Violence Prevention Efforts

Toolkit for Corporate Action to End Gun Violence - Page 68

Few companies report on gun violence despite obvious links to existing sustainability reporting frameworks Many companies do not report Disclosure 403-2 Disclosure 403-9 on gun violence incidents – doing Hazard identification, risk assessment, Work-related injuries so is an area for potential and incident investigation leadership. Given an increased Reporting requirements Disclosure Reporting requirements Disclosure investor focus on gun safety, it is 403-2 403-9 expected that investors will be The reporting organization shall report the following information for employees and The reporting organization shall report the following information: looking for improvements in for workers who are not employees but whose work and/or workplace is controlled a. For all employees: disclosures around gun violence by the organization: i. The number and rate of fatalities as a result of work-related injury; and gun safety. a. A description of the processes used to identify work-related hazards and assess ii. The number and rate of high-consequence work-related injuries risks on a routine and non-routine basis, and to apply the hierarchy of controls in (excluding fatalities); order to eliminate hazards and minimize risks, including: iii. The number and rate of recordable work-related injuries; Existing reporting platforms, such i. how the organization ensures the quality of these processes, including the iv. The main types of work-related injury; as GRI, cover areas where gun competency of persons who carry them out; v. The number of hours worked. ii. how the results of these processes are used to evaluate and continually b. For all workers who are not employees but whose work and/or workplace is violence should be reported. improve the occupational health and safety management system. controlled by the organization: b. A description of the processes for workers to report work-related hazards and i. The number and rate of fatalities as a result of work-related injury; hazardous situations, and an explanation of how workers are protected against ii. The number and rate of high-consequence work-related injuries reprisals. (excluding fatalities); c. A description of the policies and processes for workers to remove themselves iii. The number and rate of recordable work-related injuries; from work situations that they believe could cause injury or ill health, and an iv. The main types of work-related injury; explanation of how workers are protected against reprisals. v. The number of hours worked. d. A description of the processes used to investigate work-related incidents, b. The work-related hazards that pose a risk of high-consequence injury, including the processes to identify hazards and assess risks relating to the including: incidents, to determine corrective actions using the hierarchy of controls, and to i. how these hazards have been determined; determine improvements needed in the occupational health and safety ii. which of these hazards have caused or contributed to high- management system. consequence injuries during the reporting period; iii. actions taken or underway to eliminate these hazards and minimize risks using the hierarchy of controls. b. Any actions taken or underway to eliminate other work-related hazards and minimize risks using the hierarchy of controls. c. Whether the rates habe been calculated based on 200,000 or 1,000,000 hours worked. d. Whether and, if so, why any workers have been excluded from this disclosure, including the types of worker excluded. e. Any contextual information necessary to understand how the data have been compiled, such as any standards, methodologies, and assumptions used.

Reporting on gun violence prevention efforts Companies can report on their progress towards implementing gun violence prevention efforts in their risk management reporting, sustainability reports, or along with reporting on other community initiatives. Policy Efforts KPIs • The company publishes a gun violence • Implementing gun violence prevention • Number of suppliers that have committed prevention policy stating: policies to a value chain free from gun violence • Where the company interacts with • Investing in community gun violence • Number of intersection points with the the gun violence value chain prevention initiatives gun violence value chain (i.e., products, • Steps towards implementing the • Sensitization of suppliers on gun partnerships, services) policy violence prevention opportunities • Amount invested in community programs • Responsibility for overseeing the • Participation in local or national towards gun violence prevention policy advocacy initiatives • Number and type of advocacy initiatives • Connections with other company • Reporting can also be included in supported policies (i.e., workplace health and business-as-usual risk management safety, community empowerment, reporting, as many of these actions are etc.) aligned with established risk management practices

Examples of how companies have reported on gun violence in annual sustainability reports Both Molson Coors and UPS have lost employees on the job to gun violence. Molson Coors explicitly mentioned the incident, while UPS listed the fatalities from the shooting. On February 26, UPS lost three 2020, a mass employees to gun shooting occurred violence in 2016. at the Molson They do not Coors Beverage specifically CompanyinMilwa mention the ukee, killing six shooting in their employees. report, but they reported on fatalities as required by GRI.

Annex Key Terms and Definitions

Toolkit for Corporate Action to End Gun Violence - Page 72
Toolkit for Corporate Action to End Gun Violence - Page 73

Resources for Employee Resource Groups

Existing Employee Resource Groups can work to address gun violence with their members ERGs may already be working to address other issues intricately linked to gun violence, such as mental health and domestic violence. HEALTH AND MENTAL HEALTH DOMESTIC COMMUNITY SAFETY VIOLENCE DEVELOPMENT Companies have a Companies have made Companies are Gun violence responsibility to provide public commitments to recognizing their disproportionately impacts safe working environments support their employees’ responsibility to support lower-income communities. for their employees – mental health. Nearly 2/3 employees experiencing Businesses support something they cannot of gun deaths are domestic violence. In an community development reasonably guarantee suicides. average month, 53 through their foundations, given the current state of American women are volunteer hours, and other gun violence in the US. shot to death by an community engagement intimate partner, and the efforts. risk of death is 5x greater when a gun is present.

Resources for Employee Resource Groups Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) can play an important role in raising awareness amongst employees on gun violence, supporting victims, and working with company leadership to ensure a value chain free of gun violence. Some ERGs may already by talking about issues related to gun violence, such as mental health and domestic violence. ERG Activities and Resources • Advocate for your company to move to a guns free 401(k) using As You Sow’s. Free Action Toolkit • Hold a safe gun storage training with an external provider. • Share resources on safe storage and gun safety education from external organizations if needed, such as safe gun storage, BEsmart For Kids, One Thing You Can Do which provides state-specific information. • Participate in National Gun Violence Awareness Day (June 4) and Wear Orange to demonstrate support for the gun violence prevention movement. • Hold a fundraising campaign for a gun violence prevention organization such as those mentioned on slide 83. • Advocate for your employer to use the Toolkit for Corporate Action to End Gun Violence to ensure their value chain is free of gun violence.

Additional resources from Everytown for Gun Safety & Moms Demand Action Everytown for Gun Safety is the largest gun violence prevention organization in America. It was started in 2013 by Mayors Against Illegal Guns and Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America to end gun violence. Everytown combines research, policy, litigation, advocacy, and grassroots organizing to grow growing into a movement of more than 8 million supporters. Learn about Everytown for Gun Safety’s on their website. • See how business has taken action to promote gun safety. • Learn about the economic cost of gun violencein the United States. • Find out more about how gun violence impacts the communities you care about here. • Check out the Gun Law Navigator, the largest historical database of modern U.S. gun laws dating back to 1991, compare the strength of state gun laws, track trends over time, and identify gaps in the gun laws in your state. Check out Moms Demand Action, grassroots movement of Americans fighting for public safety measures that can protect people from gun violence. They pass stronger gun laws and work to close the loopholes that jeopardize the safety of families. They also work in communities and with business leaders to encourage a culture of responsible gun ownership.

The Coalition to Stop Gun Violence – a coalition of 47 organizations working together to secure freedom from gun violence through research, strategic engagement and effective policy advocacy. The Brady Campaignstrives to “create a safer America for all of us that will lead to a dramatic reduction in gun deaths and injuries.” They are aiming to cut the number of Additional Gun U.S. gun deaths in half by 2025 by focusing on background checks, stopping ‘Bad Apple’ gun dealers, and voicing the dangers of keeping guns in the home. Safety Policy & Advocacy States United to Prevent Gun Violence – an affiliation of 30 state gun-violence- Organizations prevention groups working to make communities safer through common sense laws and anti-violence education. Giffords – an organization dedicated to saving lives from gun violence. Led by former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, we inspire the courage of people from all walks of life to make America safer.

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